Is it low IQ to be addicted to energy drinks?

yes is low IQ because all those energy drinks are a scam,they are just concentrated sugar+ cafeine
you can replace with PEPSI which have similar ingredients but 10x cheaper

Fabie wrote:yes is low IQ because all those energy drinks are a scam,they are just concentrated sugar+ cafeine
you can replace with PEPSI which have similar ingredients but 10x cheaper


Well, redbull has Taurine which activates the GABA receptors.

Fabie wrote:yes is low IQ because all those energy drinks are a scam,they are just concentrated sugar+ cafeine
you can replace with PEPSI which have similar ingredients but 10x cheaper


Pepsi is like 50% cheaper than the average energy drink

kunikus* wrote:
Fabie wrote:yes is low IQ because all those energy drinks are a scam,they are just concentrated sugar+ cafeine
you can replace with PEPSI which have similar ingredients but 10x cheaper


Well, redbull has Taurine which activates the GABA receptors.


surely such acid us used to neutralize the excess of sugar , similar method is used in PEPSI and COCA COLA but those ones use phosphoric acid instead

Fabie wrote:
kunikus* wrote:
Well, redbull has Taurine which activates the GABA receptors.


surely such acid us used to neutralize the excess of sugar , similar method is used in PEPSI and COCA COLA but those ones use phosphoric acid instead


But there IS a difference.

What are you a fucking Chav?
YOUR PAIN IS EVERLASTING.

Suppressed insanity. Ignoring messed-up thoughts. A peaceful mind.
A slim girl to kiss and fuck you? Uhhhhhh nooo
Feels like development rust
Rotting over the top
With no female attention to bring me down

Tied up in Babia
Thinking this is fun
Should be everlasting
But soon becomes dull

So I’m fighting through the crowd. Ignoring total normies. They're lying dead ends.
But then I get this feeling...
Uhhh
A long term ploy
I’m up in the black pill cloud
Not sure how to get back down

Tied up in Babia
Thinking this is fun
Should be everlasting
Resting with no one

Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and cigarette tar combined
Dead and alive
And sounding so sleepy
Uhhh
Unattractive eye area
Start to idolize
I don’t wanna be social

Tied up in Babia
Thinking this is fun
Should be everlasting
But soon becomes dull

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruCp1lgNcgc

kunikus* wrote:
Fabie wrote:
surely such acid us used to neutralize the excess of sugar , similar method is used in PEPSI and COCA COLA but those ones use phosphoric acid instead


But there IS a difference.


yes but the acids will not give you more energy, they will prevent you to vomit by the enourm amount of sugar those drinks contain
the energy is given only by the sugar, the cafeine will help to keep you awake and alert

Fabie wrote:
kunikus* wrote:
But there IS a difference.


yes but the acids will not give you more energy, they will prevent you to vomit by the enourm amount of sugar those drinks contain
the energy is given only by the sugar, the cafeine will help to keep you awake and alert


Boyo the difference is Taurine, it might be cheap but it's still a "downer" similar to kava kava and benzos.

kunikus* wrote:
Fabie wrote:
yes but the acids will not give you more energy, they will prevent you to vomit by the enourm amount of sugar those drinks contain
the energy is given only by the sugar, the cafeine will help to keep you awake and alert


Boyo the difference is Taurine, it might be cheap but it's still a "downer" similar to kava kava and benzos.


this but to be real i never tried taurine alone, so how legit is it for panic attacks and anxiety?

ugliest wrote:
kunikus* wrote:
Boyo the difference is Taurine, it might be cheap but it's still a "downer" similar to kava kava and benzos.


this but to be real i never tried taurine alone, so how legit is it for panic attacks and anxiety?


Is very legit for both but... I'm not sure if it's safe to take every day because it's a gaba receptor agonist just like benzos, I've used it and I felt complete anxiety relief at 3 to 4 grams but it made me nauseous as fuck, so be careful.

Taurine is a potent activator of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors in the thalamus.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18171928/


----


Medical News T. 2010 Jan 18

Scientists Close In On Taurine's Activity In The Brain

Dr. Minerva Yue, Dr. Angelo Keramidas, Dr. Peter A. Goldstein, Dr. Dev Chandra, Dr. Gregg E. Homanics

Source: U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Taurine is one of the most plentiful amino acids in the human brain, but neuroscientists are still puzzled by just how brain cells put it to use. Now, a team of researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City has uncovered a prime site of activity for the molecule, bringing them closer to solving that mystery.

"We have discovered that taurine is a strong activator of what are known as GABA receptors in a regulatory area of the brain called the thalamus," says study senior author Dr. Neil L. Harrison, professor of pharmacology and pharmacology in anesthesiology at Weill Cornell Medical College. "We had discovered these receptors two years ago and showed that they interact with a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) -- the brain's key inhibitory transmitter -- that is also involved in brain development. It seems that taurine shares these receptors."

The finding is a surprise and opens the door to a better understanding of taurine's impact on the brain, the researchers report in this month's issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

And while the amino acid is made naturally by the body, it's also a much-touted ingredient in so-called "energy drinks" such as Red Bull. "Its inclusion in these supplements is a little puzzling, because our research would suggest that instead of being a pick-me-up, the taurine actually would have more of a sedative effect on the brain," Dr. Harrison says.

Still, the prime focus of the new study was simply to find a site for the neurological activity of taurine; such a site has been missing despite many years of study.

"Scientists have long questioned whether taurine might act on an as-yet-undiscovered receptor of its own," notes lead researcher Dr. Fan Jia, postdoctoral scientist in the Department of Anesthesiology. "But after some recent work in our lab, we ended up zeroing in on this population of GABA receptors in the thalamus."

The thalamus, located deep in the brain's center, is involved in what neuroscientists call "behavioral state control," helping to regulate transitions between sleep and wakefulness, for example. "It's like a railway junction, controlling information traffic between the brainstem, the senses and the executive functions in the cortex," Dr. Harrison explains. "When you're sleeping, the thalamus is discharging slowly and isolates the cortex from sensory input. But when you're awake, the thalamus allows information from the sensory system to activate the cortex."

Investigating further, the researchers exposed thin slices of thalamic tissue from the brains of mice to concentrations of taurine that were similar to what might be found in the human brain.

"We found that taurine is extraordinarily active on this population of GABA receptors in the thalamus," Dr. Harrison says. "It came as a bit of a surprise that the same receptor was used by both taurine and GABA. Nevertheless, finding taurine's receptor has been like discovering the 'missing link' in taurine biology."

Of course, the question of what taurine actually does in the brain remains unanswered for now. "Unraveling that mystery is the prime goal of that research, and that's where we're headed next." Dr. Harrison says.

There's already one leading theory: "GABA is important for forging new cell-to-cell connections within the developing brain, and because taurine shares a receptor with GABA, it, too, may play a role in neurological development," the researcher speculates.

And what about the energy-drink connection? "Remarkably little is known about the effects of energy drinks on the brain. We can't even be sure how much of the taurine in the drink actually reaches the brain!" Dr. Harrison says. "Assuming that some of it does get absorbed, the taurine -- which, if anything, seems to have a sedating effect on the brain -- may actually play a role in the 'crash' people often report after drinking these highly caffeinated beverages. People have speculated that the post-Red Bull low was simply a caffeine rebound effect, but it might also be due to the taurine content."

also check: http://www.longecity.org/forum/topic/54 ... fectively/

Yes, they are very unhealthy, i literally never drink them, a cup of black coffee will do the trick just fine for me, but so many fucking normies drink it and it makes me want to puke
Image

kunikus* wrote:
ugliest wrote:
this but to be real i never tried taurine alone, so how legit is it for panic attacks and anxiety?


Is very legit for both but... I'm not sure if it's safe to take every day because it's a gaba receptor agonist just like benzos, I've used it and I felt complete anxiety relief at 3 to 4 grams but it made me nauseous as fuck, so be careful.

Taurine is a potent activator of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors in the thalamus.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18171928/
thanks a lot friend

----


Medical News T. 2010 Jan 18

Scientists Close In On Taurine's Activity In The Brain

Dr. Minerva Yue, Dr. Angelo Keramidas, Dr. Peter A. Goldstein, Dr. Dev Chandra, Dr. Gregg E. Homanics

Source: U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Taurine is one of the most plentiful amino acids in the human brain, but neuroscientists are still puzzled by just how brain cells put it to use. Now, a team of researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City has uncovered a prime site of activity for the molecule, bringing them closer to solving that mystery.

"We have discovered that taurine is a strong activator of what are known as GABA receptors in a regulatory area of the brain called the thalamus," says study senior author Dr. Neil L. Harrison, professor of pharmacology and pharmacology in anesthesiology at Weill Cornell Medical College. "We had discovered these receptors two years ago and showed that they interact with a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) -- the brain's key inhibitory transmitter -- that is also involved in brain development. It seems that taurine shares these receptors."

The finding is a surprise and opens the door to a better understanding of taurine's impact on the brain, the researchers report in this month's issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

And while the amino acid is made naturally by the body, it's also a much-touted ingredient in so-called "energy drinks" such as Red Bull. "Its inclusion in these supplements is a little puzzling, because our research would suggest that instead of being a pick-me-up, the taurine actually would have more of a sedative effect on the brain," Dr. Harrison says.

Still, the prime focus of the new study was simply to find a site for the neurological activity of taurine; such a site has been missing despite many years of study.

"Scientists have long questioned whether taurine might act on an as-yet-undiscovered receptor of its own," notes lead researcher Dr. Fan Jia, postdoctoral scientist in the Department of Anesthesiology. "But after some recent work in our lab, we ended up zeroing in on this population of GABA receptors in the thalamus."

The thalamus, located deep in the brain's center, is involved in what neuroscientists call "behavioral state control," helping to regulate transitions between sleep and wakefulness, for example. "It's like a railway junction, controlling information traffic between the brainstem, the senses and the executive functions in the cortex," Dr. Harrison explains. "When you're sleeping, the thalamus is discharging slowly and isolates the cortex from sensory input. But when you're awake, the thalamus allows information from the sensory system to activate the cortex."

Investigating further, the researchers exposed thin slices of thalamic tissue from the brains of mice to concentrations of taurine that were similar to what might be found in the human brain.

"We found that taurine is extraordinarily active on this population of GABA receptors in the thalamus," Dr. Harrison says. "It came as a bit of a surprise that the same receptor was used by both taurine and GABA. Nevertheless, finding taurine's receptor has been like discovering the 'missing link' in taurine biology."

Of course, the question of what taurine actually does in the brain remains unanswered for now. "Unraveling that mystery is the prime goal of that research, and that's where we're headed next." Dr. Harrison says.

There's already one leading theory: "GABA is important for forging new cell-to-cell connections within the developing brain, and because taurine shares a receptor with GABA, it, too, may play a role in neurological development," the researcher speculates.

And what about the energy-drink connection? "Remarkably little is known about the effects of energy drinks on the brain. We can't even be sure how much of the taurine in the drink actually reaches the brain!" Dr. Harrison says. "Assuming that some of it does get absorbed, the taurine -- which, if anything, seems to have a sedating effect on the brain -- may actually play a role in the 'crash' people often report after drinking these highly caffeinated beverages. People have speculated that the post-Red Bull low was simply a caffeine rebound effect, but it might also be due to the taurine content."

also check: http://www.longecity.org/forum/topic/54 ... fectively/

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